GRAHAM HANCOCK UNDERWORLD EBOOK

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Read "Underworld The Mysterious Origins of Civilization" by Graham Hancock available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. Postscript 1 / The Underworld in the Gulf of Cambay Appendix 4 / Comments by Graham Hancock on the NIO Statement of 9 April Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Already a huge success in England, this lengthy Underworld: The Mysterious Origins of Civilization by [Hancock, Graham]. Audible Sample. Audible Sample. Playing Playing Loading Loading.


Graham Hancock Underworld Ebook

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Results 1 - 10 of 18 download Graham Hancock eBooks to read online or download in PDF or ePub on your PC, Underworld: The Mysterious Origins of Civilization. A worldwide exploration diving for the underwater ruins of a lost civilization. Underworld: Flooded Kingdoms of the Ice Age, by Graham Hancock. Underworld takes you on a remarkable journey to the bottom of the ocean in a thrilling hunt for ancient Underworld by Graham Hancock. download download the Ebook.

WOLF: No, no not at all. No, the question was, or is still, is it and, if yes, to what extent is it made by man or overworked by man? This is the question. WOLF: Yes. But almost nobody else is working on it, I think, at the moment? So that is a marvel. It is a very beautiful formation. I prompted. It stands in 18 metres of water metres to the west of the terraces of the main monument.

When above sea level or 10, years ago I suggest that it was originally a natural and untouched rocky knoll rising about 6 metres above ground level. A curving sloped ramp 3 metres wide was then cut into the side of the knoll and a retaining wall to the full height of the original mound was left in place enclosing and protecting the outside edge of the ramp.

I lead Wolf to the base of the ramp and as we swam up it I pointed out how the outer curve of the inner wall — which rises two metres above the floor of the ramp and is formed by the body of the mound — is precisely matched by the inner curve of the outer wall, which also rises to a height of two metres above the ramp floor, so that both walls run perfectly parallel. Moreover when we swam up and over the rim of the outer wall we could see that its own outer curve again exactly matches the curves within and that it drops sheer to the sea-bed — as it should if it is indeed a purposeful wall and not simply a natural structure.

I showed Wolf that the ramp floor itself, though battered and damaged in places, must originally have had a smooth, flat surface. I also showed him what I believe may have been the function of the ramp.

And it rises from here around to this corner and, in fact, if we follow it all the way round it leads us to a view of the megaliths. Now this wall is not a bank.

It is a wall. GH: Above this above this ramp, whatever you want to call it. So I simply cannot understand the combination of clean bedrock here [indicates the ramp floor], admittedly very eroded and damaged — but clean bedrock here, and these heavily overgrown walls, which are definitely wall-like in appearance and rather high in the sense that they have an outer and an inner edge, and the curve of the outer edge matches the curve of the inner edge; and the same on the other wall.

He therefore drew my attention now to a place on land on Yonaguni called Sananudai that we had taken a look at the day before where he had shown me wall-like formations — admittedly only half a metre high — that had been formed entirely naturally: WOLF: Okay, this is a real challenge to solve. But if you remember, the day before we have been on a platform on land — I forgot the name of the point — GH: Sananudai?

WOLF: Right, correct. And by chance we went further down near the sea, and I showed you these encrustation patterns and maybe you remember that I.. GH: I remember distinctly; you told me that a hard patina formed on the outside of the rock and that the water softened out the inside, leaving a wall -like shape in place. WOLF: Correct. And on the other side, the relatively soft sandstone had already begun to be removed. I mean what I saw at Sananudai was actually no curved walls running in parallel with each other, but rather straight and they were about half metre high.

WOLF: They were at beginning stage. And if you had a look closer down, you would have seen that there was a little curving, not as clear as this, I have to admit. GH: So would you want to explain those walls [on either side of the ramp] that way, as a hard patina which was preserved, and the soft part was cut out?

WOLF: At first, and then subsequently overgrown by organisms as we saw.

But to get clear what that really is, so I underline repeatedly, it is a challenge, and this is the first and only explanation I have for this. Are they made of single patterns like stones or something? I think they cut down into the living rock, and they created the walls by cutting, and then later on the encrustation came and grew on top of the walls.

WOLF: I mean, if this was the case, then it would still be very useful to have a look on the core of these. It would tell us exactly what sort of material it was — was it soft sandstone, was it hard mudstone or what else?

And we would be possibly able to find any marks on them, which then would give us the clear proof GH: So what we have here is a bit of a puzzle which needs some serious research done on it. The Tunnel and The Megaliths On our second dive we visited the twin megaliths, weighing approximately tonnes each, stacked side by side like two huge slices of toast in a west-facing alcove in the northwest corner of the main monument.

As noted earlier, a prime side-on view of these hulking rectangular blocks unfolds from the top of the curved sloping ramp explored on the first dive. The knoll in turn co-joins other massive, heavily overgrown structures presumed to be outcrops of natural bedrock which form an almost continuous barricade, three metres high and five metres thick, thrown out in a loose semi-circle in front of the megaliths — all at roughly metres water depth.

The barricade is penetrated at only one point, and there only by a narrow tunnel a little over a metre wide and about a metre and a half high through which a scuba diver swimming horizontally may pass comfortably. There is insufficient room to stand up within the tunnel, indeed barely enough even to crouch, so when it was above water or 10, years ago any human entering it would have been obliged to crawl through to the other side.

The swim ahead to the base of the megaliths is a matter of 20 metres and you observe immediately at this point that they do not stand on the sea-bed but are elevated about two metres above it, with their bases resting on a platform of boulders, and framed in a cleft.

The side of the cleft to your right is formed by the rear corner of the main terraced monument; the side to your left is formed by a lower ridge of rock which also shows signs, though to a lesser degree, of terracing. Both megaliths slope backwards at the same angle against the cleft and both are the same height just over six metres.

Both megaliths taper at top and bottom so that the gap between them, about the width of a fist at the midpoint, is not constant. Although roughened, eroded and pitted with innumerable sea-urchin holes, the megaliths can still be recognised as essentially symmetrical blocks, all the faces of which appear originally to have been smoothed off to match — although, again, whether the process that brought this effect about was entirely natural, or at some point involved the input of human skill and labour, remains thus far a matter of a very few contradictory professional opinions and no facts.

I allowed myself to float up, towards the surface, along the slope of the megaliths, resting my hand in the gap between them as a guide. The light was good and I could see right into the gap; looking back at me from the far recesses a plump red fish eyed me with horror and hoped that I would go away. As I neared the top of the megaliths, submerged under just five metres of water, I began to feel the ferocious wash of waves pounding against the surrounding rocks.

I clung on and for a few moments allowed my body to be tugged back and forth by the swell. Enshrouded in a cloud of foam I could see the northwest corner of the main monument still rising above me the final few metres towards the surface. After the dive Wolf and I again discussed what we had seen and quite soon, after some fruitless trading of opinion, our argument began to focus around a single — potentially decisive — issue. Had these very striking parallel megaliths been quarried, shaped and lowered into position beside the northwest corner of the main monument by human beings?

Or had they arrived there through wholly natural processes? Explain to me how those blocks got there. WOLF: Okay. You have seen lots of blocks fallen down — GH: All over the place. WOLF: — from beddings which have been broken, which were harder than the underlying layers; because what happens is that you get an an undercurving and undercutting of softer material under harder banks. So in my belief, these two blocks have been once one block of two sandstone banks, with either softer material in between or nothing in between, just only the bedding limits.

GH: Well, I want to know how they got where they are now.

My opinion is that these blocks have fallen down from a very, very high level, relative to their present situation. GH: But no high point overlooks them. GH: Well, yes, fair enough, nowadays. Nowadays you would have to go back in a northward direction some 50 or 60 meters, maybe more, horizontally, before you reached the cliff. GH: That we agree on. WOLF: So then there could have been places of a higher position from which these stones could have fallen down.

GH: So you are hypothesizing a pre-existing higher place from which these fell? So what this may be then — GH: Do you agree with me that this place[Indicates top of northwest corner of main monument metres above top of megaliths] is not sufficiently high?

The place we see immediately above it now? You could feel the swell hitting you quite hard and the foam above your head very strong. GH: No? GH: So we need a hypothetical high place to do it?

GH: — capable of moving it here. WOLF: Yes, of course, yes, yes no doubt about it.

Underworld: The Mysterious Origins of Civilization

GH: So we have two hypotheticals there. Above them there are then three further smaller steps giving access to the top of the monument which continues to rise northward until it comes close to the surface.

Here, very clearly, I could see the basis for the argument advanced by Wolf in Der Spiegel that the whole mass of the structure — with all its striking and emphatic terraces and steps, its perpendicular and horizontal planes — could be explained by the effects of high-energy wave action on a large outcrop of naturally bedded sedimentary rock.

According to this reasoning, therefore, I was to envisage the 12 metre x 35 metre flat-floored patio as having been cut out of the side of the original outcrop by wave action which removed the sedimentary mudstone layers in slabs — with the terraced sections being formed out of the surviving harder members of rock after the softer layers had been washed away.

Although 25 metres wide at the depth of the terraces the channel narrows to a width of less than four metres at the depth of the path. Kimura is in no doubt that this wall is the work of human beings. The Pathway We dropped in near the twin megaliths, then followed the clearly-demarcated rock-hewn pathway that seems to start or finish? As we entered the channel I pointed out to Wolf a pattern of three symmetrical indentations, each two metres in length and only about 20 centimeters high, cut at regular intervals into the junction of the northern side of the path and the base of the main monument.

I also indicated two other details that I find particularly impressive in this area: a the way that the floor of the path appears to have been deliberately flattened and smoothed to give almost a paved effect; and b the way the path is completely free of any rubble until a point about 30 metres to the east of the terraces where several large boulders and other stony debris have fallen or rolled.

I clung on and for a few moments allowed my body to be tugged back and forth by the swell. Enshrouded in a cloud of foam I could see the northwest corner of the main monument still rising above me the final few metres towards the surface. After the dive Wolf and I again discussed what we had seen and quite soon, after some fruitless trading of opinion, our argument began to focus around a single — potentially decisive — issue.

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Had these very striking parallel megaliths been quarried, shaped and lowered into position beside the northwest corner of the main monument by human beings? Or had they arrived there through wholly natural processes?

Explain to me how those blocks got there. So in my belief, these two blocks have been once one block of two sandstone banks, with either softer material in between or nothing in between, just only the bedding limits. My opinion is that these blocks have fallen down from a very, very high level, relative to their present situation.

Underworld: Flooded Kingdoms of the Ice Age (2002)

Well, yes, fair enough, nowadays. Nowadays you would have to go back in a northward direction some 50 or 60 meters, maybe more, horizontally, before you reached the cliff. So then there could have been places of a higher position from which these stones could have fallen down. So what this may be then —. Do you agree with me that this place[Indicates top of northwest corner of main monument metres above top of megaliths] is not sufficiently high?

The place we see immediately above it now? But do you remember when we came to the top of these columns, of these blocks we were coming close to the surface. You could feel the swell hitting you quite hard and the foam above your head very strong. Above them there are then three further smaller steps giving access to the top of the monument which continues to rise northward until it comes close to the surface.

Here, very clearly, I could see the basis for the argument advanced by Wolf in Der Spiegel that the whole mass of the structure — with all its striking and emphatic terraces and steps, its perpendicular and horizontal planes — could be explained by the effects of high-energy wave action on a large outcrop of naturally bedded sedimentary rock.

According to this reasoning, therefore, I was to envisage the 12 metre x 35 metre flat-floored patio as having been cut out of the side of the original outcrop by wave action which removed the sedimentary mudstone layers in slabs — with the terraced sections being formed out of the surviving harder members of rock after the softer layers had been washed away. Although 25 metres wide at the depth of the terraces the channel narrows to a width of less than four metres at the depth of the path.

Kimura is in no doubt that this wall is the work of human beings. We dropped in near the twin megaliths, then followed the clearly-demarcated rock-hewn pathway that seems to start or finish?

As we entered the channel I pointed out to Wolf a pattern of three symmetrical indentations, each two metres in length and only about 20 centimeters high, cut at regular intervals into the junction of the northern side of the path and the base of the main monument.

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I also indicated two other details that I find particularly impressive in this area: In short while he could not absolutely rule out human intervention he did not feel that it was necessary in order to explain anything that we had so far seen underwater. The result had been a high-quality six-hour documentary, aired over New Year , that made many useful and original contributions to the debate on the Yonaguni controversy.

When I saw the undersea ruins I knew instantly it was a stone quarry. I showed photographs to other stonecutters also and they all said the same. I conclude that it was done by human hands. Its absolutely impossible for something like this to be produced by nature alone He admitted that he could not be certain — although the fact that he had as yet seen no definite tool marks on any of his dives was another reason to assume that humans had not been involved.

Kimura makes a lot of the tool marks issue. He says he has definitely found marks. This, of course, is hard stone.

Very hard stone, yes. And it is heavily overgrown with organisms in many places. So we might find some marks, indeed, if we were looking a bit and if we knew where to look exactly and how to identify them clearly.

But this I mean is necessary. Had the sea randomly removed the rock layers to leave the terraces, or had it been ancient stonemasons working to a plan?

Neither scenario, we realised, could be unequivocally falsified — or proved — by the empirical evidence presently to hand. But there was another way to come at the problem which could at least test the logic of both propositions. Where we do see debris on the path itself it is in the form of a cluster of large boulders not slabs 30 metres to the east of the terraces. And the only other area that might be described as debris lies neatly stacked at an angle of 40 degrees against the sloping south face of the channel, touching but never trespassing the southern edge of the path.

I confess, however, that on all my many visits to Yonaguni — including these March dives with Wolf — I have regarded this embankment as nothing more than rubble fallen from the south side of the channel and thus paid no special attention to it. I began by reminding him of our earlier discussion about the twin megaliths, each six metres tall and weighing tons, which he claimed had fallen from above into their present position on the northwest corner of the monument from some hypothetical former high point.

Now if ever there was a place on this structure where large slabs of stone should have fallen it is here on the path, directly under where the terraces were created. Piled up here against the south wall is a huge amount of large stones which continue, in fact, up to this level [indicates sketch]. And I can very well accept that those stones fell off the top of the south side and found themselves in this position. Professor Kimura says that these stones were placed here by human beings.

I see stones that fell from up here on the south side. So imagine that this flat area around the terraces was not removed all in one go. What I mean is little small tiny pebbles, cobbles, whatever, over a long time have fallen down and they have somehow been transported and rode supported by gravity, here into this part [indicates embankment area on south side of channel] being sheltered from further transport, first of all, by these large boulders.

Again I find it difficult to grasp you here. If I stand beside these steps [indicates the two big steps in the main terrace], they tower above my head. This means a layer of rock at least two and a half metres thick, all the way around here [indicates patio area] has been removed completely to leave behind just the steps. Sundaresh does not comment on the structural characteristics of the Palace itself, which is indeed surrounded by natural caves, but notes that inside it:.

About m towards the eastern side of the caves more rock engravings were noticed on the bedrock Both the rock engravings inside the cave and on the bedrock probably carved using a tool.

Here the diver has to squeeze through gaps in a jumble of fallen boulders to enter a small, gloomy, gravel-floored chamber oriented roughly north-south with space for four or five adults standing upright. Its south wall is blocked. The doorway has a rough, damaged appearance with no obviously man-made characteristics, but beyond it is a spacious and beautiful chamber that glows with an otherworldly blue light when the sun projects down through the column of water and illuminates it through the holes in its roof.

Like the cramped antechamber this atmospheric main room is oriented north-south. It measures approximately 10 metres in length and five metres in width. Its height from floor to ceiling is also about five meters. While there has been a substantial collapse of its eastern side, its western side is undamaged and presents as a smooth vertical wall of very large megaliths supporting further megaliths that form the roof.

Across the top of its uprights, whether by accident or by design, one of the roof megaliths lies like a lintel. After having passed through this second and more impressive doorway at the northern end of the main chamber, the diver comes into a third and final room of the Palace.

This third chamber, on the other hand, was hewn or hollowed — it is premature to decide by what — out of a mass of ancient coralline limestone that is exposed in this part of Yonaguni. And since the rear northernmost chamber and alcove door are hewn out of a different kind of rock than other materials in the structure we must assume that some agency brought these two elements the rock-hewn element and the megalithic element together — and in alignment — at some point.

But was it nature that did this? Wolf would have nothing of it. In his no-nonsense view the Palace is, of course, a wholly natural phenomenon and the alignment of the three doorways is entirely coincidental.

Very probably he is right. Yet I retain a sense of deep curiosity about this structure and intend, if I can, to do more work in it at some time in the future. Yet both systems powerfully and eerily remind me of the architecture of the great megalithic passageways and burial chambers of the Kofun Age — particularly structures such as Ishibutai near Asuka where the megaliths used are of truly titanic dimensions and weights see Chapter Still, go figure where the Kofun tradition came from.

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I do not deny that they were simple hunter gatherers but the deeper I enter the labyrinth of Japanese prehistory, the more certain I feel that they were also something much more. On our sixth and final dive at Yonaguni in March I took Wolf to a place called Tatigami Iwa eight kilometres east of the Palace and about two and a half kilometres east of the main cluster of monuments around Iseki Point.

Understandably revered as a deity in local tradition it now stands lashed by the Pacific Ocean a hundred metres from shore like a ghost sentry for this haunted island. But it is what is underneath it, in the underwater landscape nearby, that really interests me and that led me to chose it as the site for our sixth dive.

First of all we have to mention that this is a totally different sort of sandstone from what we find at Iseki Point. Secondly erosion of rock, all around the world, often produces forms that look accidentally like human faces So I cannot say very much to the Face. To become clear of that fact, again, you would have to remove all the organisms around because that would give you a free view on the rock and the way it was carved.

Did you notice, looking into the eyes, the eye sockets of the face, that both of them had a central prominence? But it was my first view on that. Something else about it too, for me, is the sense that I keep finding these problems — if we look back over our drawings over the last couple of days — well here from our first dive we have within a short area, parallel curved walls, a ramp, a tunnel, two megaliths. I find — and this is how I felt always almost from the third or fourth visit that I made to Yonaguni — is that this, this fantastic combination of peculiarities in a very compact area — because as you saw today the peculiarities continue as we go further along the coast to the Face and the Stone Stage —.

So, you know, we find them along the south side but not along the north side. We find them compacted into a relatively tight area, and each one requires a rather different, and to my mind, rather complicated geological explanation, you know, disposing of a mass of rock that is two and a half metres thick and 35 metres in length [and 15 metres wide] is simply banishing it. I would ask you to have a look into new or even older geological and geographical literature. Any great sculptor still looks for the natural forms in rock and, indeed, this is an art form in Japan up to this day.

And I would say, on the contrary, that it is a natural miracle And just to finish that, my definite point of view is that all that we have seen in the last days could have been made by nature alone without the help of man. That does not mean that people did not have any influence on it. But I say it can have been shaped by nature alone.

There are several other intriguing sites around Yonaguni that I was not able to show Wolf in the time available to us in March — though I do not think any of them would have changed his mind. One of these, which takes a form that some recognise as a huge rock-hewn sea-turtle, stands at a depth of 12 metres on the shoulder of the main monument at Iseki Point approximately metres east of the terraces.

A second, badly damaged when Yonaguni was struck by an unusually severe series of typhoons in August and September , 18 is found half a kilometre due east of the terraces in about 15 metres of water.

Consisting of a one-ton boulder mounted on a centimetre-high flat platform at the apex of an enormous rocky slab almost three metres high, it has all the characteristics of a classic iwakura shrine, part natural rock, part man-made. As I noted in Chapter 25, if this shrine were to be moved to the slopes of Mount Miwa it would blend in seamlessly with what is already there.

Two other anomalous sites are located within half a kilometre of Iseki Point, that I would also very much have liked Wolf to see. The other is a second area of very large steps — on a similar scale and of a similar appearance to those of the main terrace at Iseki Point — but much further out to sea, in deeper water, and at the bottom of a protected channel.

Nor does the list of signs and wonders end here, but I think the point has been sufficiently made. Just interesting geology? Or discoveries that could fix the true origins of Japanese civilisation as far back in the Age of the Gods as the Nihongi and the Kojiki themselves claim?

These are grave questions and they cannot be answered at Yonaguni on the basis of available evidence. Wolf is right about that. It is just possible that the remarkable structures and objects that I showed him there underwater are all freaks of nature, which by some amazing additional improbability all happen to be gathered together in one place. Graham Hancock's multi-million bestseller Fingerprints of the Gods remains an astonishing, deeply controversial, wide-ranging investigation of the mysteries of our past and the evidence for Earth's lost civilization.

Twenty years on, Hancock returns with the sequel to his seminal work filled with completely new, scientific and archaeological Graham Hancock's multi-million bestseller Fingerprints of the Gods remains an astonishing, deeply The bestselling author of The Sign and the Seal reveals the true origins of civilization.

Connecting puzzling clues scattered throughout the world, Hancock discovers compelling evidence of a technologically and culturally advanced civilization that was destroyed and obliterated from human memory.

Four 8-page photo inserts. The bestselling author of The Sign and the Seal reveals the true origins of civilization An asteroid transformed Mars from a lush planet with rivers and oceans into a bleak and icy hell. Is Earth condemned to the same fate, or can we protect ourselves and our planet from extinction? In his most riveting and revealing book yet, Graham Hancock examines the evidence that the barren Red Planet was once home to a lush environment of While Graham Hancock is no stranger to stirring up heated controversy among scientific From Graham Hancock, bestselling author of Fingerprints of the Gods , comes a mesmerizing book that A compelling brew of mystery, crime, and science revealing the details behind the search for the lost Ark of the Covenant.

The Lost Ark of the Covenant is one of the great historical mysteries of all time. To believers, the Ark is the legendary vessel holding the stone tablets of the Ten Commandments.The terraces and attached staircases might have been used for handling, loading and unloading boats sailing through the channel. WOLF: I mean, if this was the case, then it would still be very useful to have a look on the core of these.

And I would say, on the contrary, that it is a natural miracle And just to finish that, my definite point of view is that all that we have seen in the last days could have been made by nature alone without the help of man.

I find — and this is how I felt always almost from the third or fourth visit that I made to Yonaguni — is that this, this fantastic combination of peculiarities in a very compact area — because as you saw today the peculiarities continue as we go further along the coast to the Face and the Stone Stage —.

To become clear of that fact, again, you would have to remove all the organisms around because that would give you a free view on the rock and the way it was carved. As we entered the channel I pointed out to Wolf a pattern of three symmetrical indentations, each two metres in length and only about 20 centimeters high, cut at regular intervals into the junction of the northern side of the path and the base of the main monument. Or discoveries that could fix the true origins of Japanese civilisation as far back in the Age of the Gods as the Nihongi and the Kojiki themselves claim?

The bestselling author of The Sign and the Seal reveals the true origins of civilization

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